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Differences Between Coded Welders vs. Certified Welders

Unlike other trades, where you are expected to pass through different hoops and have certain specialist certifications and qualifications before you become a fully qualified tradesperson, the welding industry is a little different. Some employers do ask to see certificates before employing a welder, but this isn’t the norm.    Usually, employers are more concerned with whether a welder can pass the practical welding test required by the relevant welding code. This is known as a ‘coding test’; when passed, the welder is then referred to as a ‘coded welder’. The coding test results are typically carried out at an…
image of an arc weld being carried out

Submerged Arc Welding (SAW)

What is Submerged Arc Welding? This arc welding process involves the formation of an arc between a continuously fed electrode and a workpiece. This creates a blanket of powdered flux, which helps protect the weld zone. During welding, the arc is submerged beneath the flux blanket and it is not usually visible. This type of weld is a well-established method and extremely versatile.   How does SAW work? Submerged arc welding, often referred to as ‘SAW’, is normally limited to flat or horizontal-fillet welding positions.    4 Components of Submerged Arc Welding (SAW) SAW has four common features: a welding…
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Guide to Plastic Welding

Plastic welding is a fabrication process, and one that not many people are aware exists. Broken plastics objects can undergo a cosmetic change to bring it back and save it from being thrown away. When we buy something that has plastic coating, and it gets broken, typically we replace it. However, plastic is very malleable and that means that it is quite easy to melt and reattach with a soldering iron. The repaired object might not look brand new after you’ve welded it back together, but you can smooth plastic welds and the more you practice plastic welding the less…
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Advantages & Disadvantages of Explosion Welding

What is Explosion Welding? Explosion welding is achieved by accelerating one of the components at an extremely high velocity through the use of chemical explosives. It is a solid-state welding process that is often used to clad carbon steel with a thin layer of corrosion-resistant material such as stainless steel, nickel alloy, titanium or zirconium.   History of Explosion Welding Explosion welding was developed fairly recently, unlike other forms of welding such as arc welding which was developed in the late 19th Century. The origins of explosion welding go back to World War I and in the decades after World…
image of a welder carrying out a welding process

Guide to Energy Beam Welding

What is Energy Beam Welding (EBW)? Energy beam welding otherwise referred to as electron-beam welding, is a fusion welding process. The method involves a beam of high-velocity electrons that are applied to two materials that are being joined together. The pieces melt and fuse together as the kinetic energy of the electrons is transformed into heat upon impact. EBW is a relatively new welding process and has become popular in high production applications. It is often performed under vacuum conditions which helps to prevent dissipation of the electron beam.   How are electron beams formed? Conduction electrodes are not bound…
welding two metals together

What is Butt Welding?

What is a butt weld? A butt weld is a commonly used welding technique that can be automated or done by hand on steel pieces by a welder. This technique can also be done with brazing copper pieces. Now, you may be thinking, what is a butt welding used for? Well, it is used to attach two pieces of metal together such as pipe, framework in factories and also flanges. Flanges A flange is placed either inside or outside of a piece of material in order to strengthen it. In Factories Butt welding is often used in a factory when…
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The Science of Cold Welding: How to Join Metals Without Heat

What is Cold Welding? As you may have suspected from the term ‘cold welding’, there isn’t any heat involved. Cold welding is the process of joining two metals or materials together without using any heat. Now, this may sound impossible and contrary to everything you previously thought you knew about welding. But, it is possible to bond metals without heat, and cold welding is actually one of the most popular welding methods out there. Alongside, the more commonly recognised and known: arc welding, friction welding, laser welding and ultrasonic welding. Cold welding, also known as cold pressure welding or contact…
image of a worker welding metal

Revolutionary Technique Developed to Weld Glass to Metal

Advancements Made for Welding Glass to Metal   Throughout welding history it was commonly thought that metals could only be welded to other metals, and glass only to glass; the two don’t usually weld together. However, researchers at Heriot-Watt University have developed a new, revolutionary technique that could allow glass and metal to be welded together. This is incredibly ground-breaking, and their development could transform the manufacturing industry completely. And particularly innovative for creating new products in the aerospace, defence, optics and healthcare industries. “Being able to weld glass and metals together will be a huge step forward in manufacturing…
man about to go diving underwater

How Does Underwater Welding Work?

Underwater welding sounds like a cool and interesting job role. One that involves a great deal of skill and expertise. In a previous blog we explored what is meant by the term ‘underwater welding’ and how you can become an underwater welder. Today, we’d like to focus upon the two different types of underwater welding. There are two main types of underwater welding: wet welding and dry welding. With this mind, we want to explore the questions: how does underwater welding work? How do welder-divers perform welding tasking at elevated pressures, and in particular underwater?   Main Underwater Welding Processes:…
electronic circuit board

Difference between welding, soldering and brazing

From building a laptop computer to constructing a new building, almost anything that is built using metal requires being able to join two metals together. In previous blog posts, we have covered everything from the main welding positions and joints, different types of welding, uses, equipment and PPE. Here, we are going to focus on the differences between welding and two other metal joining processes: soldering and brazing. Welding is a way of bonding two metals by melting them where they’ll meet. Whereas, soldering involves making a joint between components in an electric circuit.   What is welding and how…